9-11 2014 This is the latest of 9-11 mini-comics, my annual chance to talk about war and politics that I begin on the anniversary of 9-11. Talking about politics normally doesn’t make for particularly good comics so this allows me to get some stuff off my chest. This will be premiering at Word on the Street on Sunday.

9-11 2014
This is the latest of 9-11 mini-comics, my annual chance to talk about war and politics that I begin on the anniversary of 9-11. Talking about politics normally doesn’t make for particularly good comics so this allows me to get some stuff off my chest. This will be premiering at Word on the Street on Sunday.

Word Vancouver 2014 Festival Schedule

Believe it of not Word on the Street Book and magazine Festival is happening this Sunday! I will have a table so come out and see me, and other fine cartoonists and authors, feel free to throw wads of cash in my direction!!!

The Last Saturday, by Chris Ware

Self-portrait with tea and cat… My first drawing in Manga Studio, drawn with mouse…

Self-portrait with tea and cat…
My first drawing in Manga Studio, drawn with mouse…

…and last but not least… Private, Smaland Regiment, 1813 6” by 4”  Soft body acrylic on canvas.… After the retreat from Moscow neutral Sweden jumped on the Allied bandwagon against Napoleon, even though the Crown Prince (and de facto king) of Sweden Bernadotte was formally a Marshal of France appointed by Napoleon himself! Such are the twists and turns of European monarchy. While he himself was a brave soldier Bernadotte avoided committing his troops to battle for fear of losing his crown, to the point the Swedish officers complained he made them look like cowards. His real goal was to annex Norway, at the time the possession of Napoleon’s ally Denmark, in which Wallmoden’s Corps played a part. Some of the “Swedish” regiments were actually made up of Germans as Pomerania was a sometimes Swedish possession.Sweden at this time was quite impoverished, much of it’s uniforms and equipment were from allied sources (particularly Russian) and captured French items. This uniform is almost purely Swedish with the odd round hat, unusual lancer style girdle and Hungarian knots of the ragged trousers.
…and last but not least…

Private, Smaland Regiment, 1813
6” by 4”
Soft body acrylic on canvas.

After the retreat from Moscow neutral Sweden jumped on the Allied bandwagon against Napoleon, even though the Crown Prince (and de facto king) of Sweden Bernadotte was formally a Marshal of France appointed by Napoleon himself! Such are the twists and turns of European monarchy. While he himself was a brave soldier Bernadotte avoided committing his troops to battle for fear of losing his crown, to the point the Swedish officers complained he made them look like cowards. His real goal was to annex Norway, at the time the possession of Napoleon’s ally Denmark, in which Wallmoden’s Corps played a part. Some of the “Swedish” regiments were actually made up of Germans as Pomerania was a sometimes Swedish possession.Sweden at this time was quite impoverished, much of it’s uniforms and equipment were from allied sources (particularly Russian) and captured French items. This uniform is almost purely Swedish with the odd round hat, unusual lancer style girdle and Hungarian knots of the ragged trousers.
Trooper, 1st Hussar regiment of the Russo-Prussian Legion  6” by 4”  Soft body acrylic on canvas.
Much of Napoleons army that invaded Russia was made up of allied contingents from all over Europe who were more or less forced into contribut…ing forces. During the retreat from Moscow the lucky ones were those able to surrender to the Russian regular army before the cold, the Cossacks or partisans got them. Some German prisoners were formed into an all arms legion equipped and uniformed by the Russians. The Russo-Prussian Legion eventually was transferred to the Prussian army as the German Legion and fought at Waterloo still in their Russian uniforms as regular regiments of the Prussian army, although the hussars were by then converted into lancers. He wears the spectacular concave Russian 1812 shako.
Trooper, 1st Hussar regiment of the Russo-Prussian Legion
6” by 4”
Soft body acrylic on canvas.

Much of Napoleons army that invaded Russia was made up of allied contingents from all over Europe who were more or less forced into contributing forces. During the retreat from Moscow the lucky ones were those able to surrender to the Russian regular army before the cold, the Cossacks or partisans got them. Some German prisoners were formed into an all arms legion equipped and uniformed by the Russians. The Russo-Prussian Legion eventually was transferred to the Prussian army as the German Legion and fought at Waterloo still in their Russian uniforms as regular regiments of the Prussian army, although the hussars were by then converted into lancers. He wears the spectacular concave Russian 1812 shako.

Musketeer, Hanseatic League 6” by 4”  Soft body acrylic on canvas. The Hanseatic League began in the Middle Ages as a federation of German mercantile city-states along the Baltic Sea and the river trade routes into the interior. Once a …major power, by 1813 the Hanseatic League was a shadow of it’s former self, consisting of the of (still prosperous) cities states of Lubeck, Hamburg and Bremen. The French annexed the cities in 1806 so in 1813 volunteers rallied to restore their independence with a small all arms force. The initial uniform was improvised, a green litekwa, (a German “peasant” coat) and cap that were popular with Landwehr and nationalist volunteers Freikorps, although others changed into more regular uniforms as soon as they could or their original uniforms wore out. For example the Hanseatic forces would later dress in Russian uniforms, The equipment could be from many sources, Russian, German, captured French or even British imports.
Musketeer, Hanseatic League
6” by 4”
Soft body acrylic on canvas.

The Hanseatic League began in the Middle Ages as a federation of German mercantile city-states along the Baltic Sea and the river trade routes into the interior. Once a major power, by 1813 the Hanseatic League was a shadow of it’s former self, consisting of the of (still prosperous) cities states of Lubeck, Hamburg and Bremen. The French annexed the cities in 1806 so in 1813 volunteers rallied to restore their independence with a small all arms force. The initial uniform was improvised, a green litekwa, (a German “peasant” coat) and cap that were popular with Landwehr and nationalist volunteers Freikorps, although others changed into more regular uniforms as soon as they could or their original uniforms wore out. For example the Hanseatic forces would later dress in Russian uniforms, The equipment could be from many sources, Russian, German, captured French or even British imports.

Trooper, Royal Horse Artillery, Mounted Rocket Corps 6” by 4”  Soft body acrylic on canvas.
The British contribution to Wallmoden’s Corps was the 73rd foot, a battalion of Scots, an all arms contingent from the King’s German Legion and a Rocket Detachment. The debate over the value of Congeve’s Rockets continues to this day. Based on Indian examples the rockets were essentially a large firework on a stick fired from a trough that could fitted with various warheads. Used mainly by the Royal Navy they were mobile but terribly erratic and inaccurate. The Duke of Wellington had no use for them, he considered them only fit to burn cities with, which was what the British essentially did to Copenhagen in 1807. On the other hand there are accounts of British rocket batteries having a devastating effect on enemy troops, for example at the battle of Leipzig, the noise and burns cause by a shrieking rocket bounding through a close order formation could demoralise any enemy unfortunate enough to be hit by one. One suspects that the RHA Rocket Batteries were sent to Germany to get them out of the way.

Trooper, Royal Horse Artillery, Mounted Rocket Corps
6” by 4”
Soft body acrylic on canvas.

The British contribution to Wallmoden’s Corps was the 73rd foot, a battalion of Scots, an all arms contingent from the King’s German Legion and a Rocket Detachment. The debate over the value of Congeve’s Rockets continues to this day. Based on Indian examples the rockets were essentially a large firework on a stick fired from a trough that could fitted with various warheads. Used mainly by the Royal Navy they were mobile but terribly erratic and inaccurate. The Duke of Wellington had no use for them, he considered them only fit to burn cities with, which was what the British essentially did to Copenhagen in 1807. On the other hand there are accounts of British rocket batteries having a devastating effect on enemy troops, for example at the battle of Leipzig, the noise and burns cause by a shrieking rocket bounding through a close order formation could demoralise any enemy unfortunate enough to be hit by one. One suspects that the RHA Rocket Batteries were sent to Germany to get them out of the way.